Our Lord Jesus Christ, King of the Universe

From the Dean’s Desk

We come today to the final Sunday of the Church’s liturgical year.  It is always celebrated as Christ the King.  This title may be a little misleading, as we normally associate royalty with power, wealth, territory, prestige and the like.  Jesus presents himself as a different king.  Since news of his birth was made known to the people of Israel, he had been announced as the infant king of the Jews. This unsettled the monarchy of the day, believing Jesus, who was a baby at that stage to eventually grow into an adult who will be a threat to their position.  The normal thing to do was to make sure that the baby never reached adulthood.  So from his infancy Jesus was seen as a threat to the present power structure.

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Fr John Paul Escarlan - Farewell

We have had over two great years with Fr John Paul. Now we  sadly have to say ‘goodbye and thank you’ for the many wonderful ways he has served our parish especially his work with our Youth groups. He will be dearly missed.

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33rd Sunday in Ordinary time, 13 Nov 2016

From the Dean’s Desk

Today’s liturgy marks the second last week of the Church’s liturgical year, and so it is not  surprising that we have the theme of the end time mentioned in the readings.  Last week, our Gospel focused on the notion of resurrection and the afterlife [Luke 20:27-38] with Jesus’  confrontation with the Sadducees over this issue.  The Gospel [21:5-19] lies between the entry of Jesus into Jerusalem and the beginning of the Passion Narrative.  As such it is a  preparation and reminder to the followers of Jesus that times will become difficult for them.  All that they need to have in order to overcome these difficult times is faith and perseverance – all else will take care of itself.

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32nd Sunday in Ordinary time, 6 Nov 2016

From the Dean’s Desk

Life after death has been an aspect of human thought for quite some time. It has been the basis of novels and the film industry, where we have stories of people ‘living’ after death. This basic tenet is proclaimed during our Creed on two accounts. Firstly, that Jesus on the third day (he) ‘rose again in fulfilment of the Scriptures’. Secondly we proclaim that ‘we look for the resurrection of the dead, and the life of the world to come.’ In today’s Gospel [Luke 20:27.34-38] Jesus reminds us of this life after death, and that this life consists of a resurrected life that will transform our whole existence. It comes as a result of a question put to Jesus by the Sadducees, a Jewish philosophical school that did not believe in the existence of either angels or in the resurrection of the dead. Jesus’ response to the ‘problem’ voiced by the Sadducees reminds us of the words we pray in the first Preface for Christian Death: “Lord for your people, life is changed not ended…’

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31st Sunday in Ordinary time, 30 Oct 2016

From the Dean’s Desk

This Sunday’s Gospel [Luke 19:1-10] is another story of God’s mercy and grace in the life of a sinner. It holds for us the notion of God’s intimate and surprising presence in the lives of those who least expect to receive God’s mercy. We begin the passage with Jesus’ entry into the city of Jericho, a well-positioned city in the Jordan Valley. Because of its geographic location and industry, it was a city which was a source of great revenue for the Romans. Here in Jericho we meet Zacchaeus, a tax collector who had climbed to the top of his profession. The presumption here is that Zacchaeus achieved this position by taxing the people more than was required, thus keeping the ‘profit’ for himself.

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